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Two stand alone industrial hemp bills have been introduced in the 113th Congress so far. H.R. 525, the "Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013," was introduced in the U.S. House on February 6, 2013. A companion bill, S. 359, was introduced in the U.S. Senate on February 14, 2013. The bills define industrial hemp, exclude it from the definition of "marihuana" in the Controlled Substances Act, and gives states the exclusive authority to regulate the growing and processing of industrial hemp under state law.

Please see the Quick Links below for much more information.


On February 6, 2013, Representatives Thomas Massie (R-KY) and Kurt Schrader (D-OR) introduced H.R. 525, the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013, along with 27 original cosponsors. Please see below for further details.

Quick Links Concerning H.R. 525
The "Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013"

Read the full text of H.R. 525 as introduced (PDF file 254k)

THOMAS (Library of Congress) bill information for H.R. 525 - Bill Summary & Status - 113th Congress

Vote Hemp's automatically updated page of the THOMAS information

CRS Report: Hemp as an Agricultural Commodity, December 18, 2012 (PDF file 483k)

Read Rep. Massie's press release


On February 14, 2013, Senators Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Rand Paul (R-KY) introduced S. 359, the Senate companion bill to H.R. 525, along with original cosponsors Senator Jeff Merkley (D-OR) and Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY). Note that the bill language of S. 359 is not identical to H.R. 525. Please see below for further details.

Quick Links Concerning S. 359
The "Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013"
A bill to amend the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of marihuana, and for other purposes.

Read the full text of S. 359 as introduced (PDF file 250k)

THOMAS (Library of Congress) bill information for S. 359 - Bill Summary & Status - 113th Congress

Read Sen. Wyden's Senate floor comments from February 14, 2013. (PDF file 127k)

Read Senator Wyden's press release Senators Seek to Lift Restrictions on Industrial Hemp announcing the introduction of the Senate companion bill.

Read Senator Paul's press release Sens. McConnell and Paul Co-sponsor Industrial Hemp Legislation.

Read Senator McConnell's press release Senators Seek to Lift Restrictions on Industrial Hemp.

Read Senator McConnell's press release Sens. McConnell and Paul Co-sponsor Industrial Hemp Legislation.

Read our press release announcing the introduction of the Senate companion bill.

Watch Sen. Wyden's Senate floor comments on June 13, 2012 after the introduction of his hemp farming amendment to the Farm Bill. (Youtube HD)


On May 20, 2013 Senator Wyden introduced Senate Amendment 952 (S.AMDT.952), an Industrial Hemp Amendment to the Farm Bill. The language is the same as S. 359, the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013, which has bipartisan support. After a handful of amendments were voted on, cloture was filed on the Senate version of the Farm Bill, which was successful. So, debate was cut off and amendments that had not been voted on yet, like the Wyden hemp amendment, did not become part fo the bill.

Quick Links Concerning Senate Amendment 952

THOMAS (Library of Congress) bill information for S.AMDT.952 - Bill Summary & Status - 113th Congress


On June 18, 2013 Representative Jared Polis introduced introduced House Amendment 208 (H.AMDT.208), an Industrial Hemp Amendment to the Farm Bill, also known as "Polis of Colorado Part B Amendment No. 37." The amendment allows institutions of higher education to grow or cultivate industrial hemp for the purpose of agricultural or academic research. The provision only applies to states that already permit industrial hemp growth and cultivation under state law. The language of the amendment is not is the same as H.R. 525, the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013. More information may be found below. The vote was 225 to 200 in favor of the amendment, which was thus attached to the Farm Bill. But, the House version of the Farm Bill failed on a 195 to 234 vote.

On July 11, 2013 a new version of the Farm Bill, H.R. 2642, passed the House by a vote of 216 to 208 and included the Polis hemp amendment. The bipartisan hemp amendment, which was introduced by Representatives Jared Polis (D-CO), Thomas Massie (R-KY), and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) and passed by a vote of 225 to 200 on a previous version of the Farm Bill, survived and is part of the House version this time around. The amendment allows colleges and universities to grow hemp for academic and agricultural research purposes. It applies only to states where industrial hemp farming is already legal under state law.

On July 11, 2013 a new version of the Farm Bill, H.R. 2642, passed the House by a vote of 216 to 208 and included the Polis hemp amendment. The bipartisan hemp amendment, which was introduced by Representatives Jared Polis (D-CO), Thomas Massie (R-KY), and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) and passed by a vote of 225 to 200 on a previous version of the Farm Bill, survived and is part of the House version this time around. The amendment allows colleges and universities to grow hemp for academic and agricultural research purposes. It applies only to states where industrial hemp farming is already legal under state law.

On January 27, 2014 the Farm Bill Conference Committee released the conference report on the Farm Bill, which included Section 7606 - Legitimacy of Industrial Hemp Research an amended version of the Polis hemp amendment.

On February 7, 2014, President Obama signed the Farm Bill of 2014 into law. Section 7606 of the act, Legitimacy of Industrial Hemp Research, defines industrial hemp as distinct and authorizes institutions of higher education or state departments of agriculture in states where hemp is legal to grow hemp for research or agricultural pilot programs. Since hemp has not been grown in the United States since 1957, there is a strong need for research to develop new varieties of hemp that grow well in various states and meet the current market demands.

Please see below for more detailed legislative information on the 2014 Farm Bill.

Please see our 2014 Farm Bill - Section 7606 page for guidance information for prospective researchers and state departments of agriculture.

Quick Links Concerning House Amendment 208
Polis of Colorado Part B Amendment No. 37
Amendment allows institutions of higher education to grow or cultivate industrial hemp for the purpose of agricultural or academic research. Amendment applies only to states that already permit industrial hemp growth and cultivation under state law.
and Section 7606 - Legitimacy of Industrial Hemp Research in the Farm Bill.
The Conference substitute adopts the House provision with an amendment. The amendment authorizes an institution of higher education or State department of agriculture to grow or cultivate industrial hemp for research purposes if the laws of the State permit its growth and cultivation.

THOMAS (Library of Congress) amendment information for H.AMDT.208 - Bill Summary & Status - 113th Congress, also known as "Polis of Colorado Part B Amendment No. 37."

House Rules Committee text of H.AMDT.208 - 113th Congress

House roll call vote on Polis of Colorado Part B Amendment No. 37 (H.AMDT.208)

THOMAS (Library of Congress) bill information for the Farm Bill H.R. 2642 - Bill Summary & Status - 113th Congress

GPO (Government Printing Office) bill text of the Farm Bill H.R. 2642 - Text - 113th Congress (PDF file 1.2 MB)

House roll call vote on the Farm Bill (H.R. 2642)

Download the text of SEC. 7606. LEGITIMACY OF INDUSTRIAL HEMP RESEARCH of the Conference Report to accompany H.R. 2642. (PDF file 37 KB)

View the text of Section 7606 - Legitimacy of Industrial Hemp Research on THOMAS (HTML). Became Public Law No: 113-79.

Download the full text of the Conference Report to accompany H.R. 2642.


History of Modern Federal Hemp Legislation

In 2005, we reached a major milestone ... for the first time since the federal government outlawed hemp farming in the United States, a federal bill was introduced that would remove restrictions on the cultivation of non-psychoactive industrial hemp. At a Capitol Hill lunch on June 23, 2005 marking the introduction of H.R. 3037, the "Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2005," Congressional staffers were treated to a delicious gourmet hemp lunch while listening to various prominent speakers tout the myriad benefits of encouraging and supporting a domestic hemp industry.

The bill was written with the help of Vote Hemp by chief sponsor Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX), and it garnered 11 additional cosponsors. The bill defined industrial hemp, excluded it from the definition of "marihuana" in the Controlled Substances Act, and assigned authority over it to the states, allowing laws in those states regulating the growing and processing of industrial hemp to take effect.

On February 13, 2007 Rep. Ron Paul introduced H.R. 1009, the "Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2007," with nine original cosponsors. The bill was assigned to comittee, but never received a hearing or a floor vote. At the end of the 110th Congress the bill had 13 cosponsors.

On April 2, 2009 Rep. Ron Paul introduced H.R. 1866, the "Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2009," with ten original cosponsors. The bill was assigned to comittee, but never received a hearing or a floor vote. At the end of the 111th Congress the bill had 25 cosponsors.

On May 12, 2011 Rep. Ron Paul introduced H.R. 1831, the "Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2011," with twenty-two original cosponsors. The bill was assigned to comittee, but never received a hearing or a floor vote. At the end of the 112th Congress Rep. Ron Paul and Rep. Barney Frank retired and the bill had 37 cosponsors. A Senate companion bill was introduced on August 2, 2012 by Sen. Ron Wyden.

On June 7, 2012 Sen. Ron Wyden introduced S.AMDT.2220, an industrial hemp to the Farm Bill. This amendment failed to be attached to the 2012 Farm Bill, but did help to find original cosponsors for the introduction of S. 3501, the "Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2012." The Farm Bill was passed by the Senate, but failed to be passed by the House. The Farm Bill will need to be revisited in the 113th Congress.

May 20, 2013 Sen. Ron Wyden introduced S.AMDT.952, an industrial hemp to the 2013 Farm Bill. This amendment failed to be attached to the Farm Bill, but did help to find original cosponsors for the introduction of S. 3501, the "Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2012."

Quick Links Concerning S.AMDT.952
The Industrial Hemp AMendment to the Farm Bill

THOMAS (Library of Congress) bill information for S.AMDT.952 - Bill Summary & Status - 113th Congress

THOMAS (Library of Congress) bill information for the Farm Bill (S.954)

Read Sen. Wyden's Senate floor comments from June 13, 2012. (PDF file 106k)

Watch Sen. Wyden's Senate floor comments from June 13, 2012. (Youtube HD)

Read our press release announcing the 2012 amendment.

 


 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
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