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State Hemp Resolution

We have crafted a draft of a resolution, which is intended to be passed by state legislatures, that urges Congress to recognize industrial hemp as a valuable agricultural commodity and to pass legislation that removes barriers to state regulation of the commercial production of industrial hemp. This is also a great way to to educate state legislators and get a hemp farming bill passed in the future as well. You can download the draft resolutions in two different formats:

2014 Draft Resolution (PDF file 57k)

2014 Draft Resolution (Word .doc file 33k)

If you are a state legislator and would like more information on writing and passing a resolution like the ones below, please email us and we would be happy to help you. Please find more resources on writing state resolutions below.

Over the past decade, many resolutions have been passed in support of hemp farming and production. On the national level, the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA), the National Grange and the National Farmers Union (NFU) have all passed such resolutions. A number of states have passed resolutions in support of hemp farming legislation on the federal level and sent copies of them to their Congressional delegations, DEA, ONDCP and The White House. State Farm Bureaus and Granges have passed resolutions. On the local level, resolutions have been introduced and/or passed in many counties and and a few county political parties have added planks to their party platforms in support of hemp farming.

While these resolutions and platform planks do not have the force of law, they can be used to change executive and administrative policy, as well as in testimony to show support for bills on the state and national levels. The process of introducing and passing them is the most important part, as it gives you the opportunity to educate people about industrial hemp and its real potential.

Adding a Plank to a Political Party Platform
The process of adding a plank to a party platform is usually pretty simple. You need to learn what the process for introducing and passing a plank is in your county or state. In many cases, but not all, you need to be elected to be a delegate to your party's state or local convention or caucus. Usually you will need to circulate a petition with the proposed language of the plank, get a certain number of delegate signatures, and then turn the petition in by a certain date. During the state or local convention or caucus of your party there will be a time to vote on the platform and new planks therein. You also may be able to bring a new plank to a vote by a procedural motion from the floor of the convention or caucus, but don't count on such last-minute tactics. Learning the process and laying the groundwork for support of the plank months in advance does have its advantages.

Here is sample language of a platform plank:

We support legalizing the farming and processing of industrial hemp, low-THC oilseed and fiber varieties of Cannabis, and funding universities in (insert State name) to research industrial hemp growth and production in the state.

Introducing and Passing a Resolution
The process of introducing and passing a resolution in support of industrial hemp farming and production at your State or County Farm Bureau, Farmers Union, Grange, FFA or other farm organization is much the same as the process for introducing and passing platform planks above. The key is learning what the process is and educating the members of the organization in support of your resolution.

Here is sample language of a farm organization resolution:

The (insert organization name) urges Congress to pass the Industrial Hemp Farming Acts (S. 359 and H.R. 525) to differentiate non-drug industrial hemp, the low-THC oilseed and fiber varieties of Cannabis, and marijuana to allow American farmers to once again grow industrial hemp under state law.

The process for introducing and passing a resolution on the state level is more complex. State legislators are familiar with this process. However, just like the process of introducing a resolution for a farm organization or a plank for a party platform, introducing a resolution before a state legislature gives the sponsor(s) the opportunity to educate fellow legislators about hemp. Introducing a resolution on the state level can help gauge the degree of support a hemp farming bill might receive, and the education done for a resolution can help lay the groundwork for such a future bill.


Quick Links Concerning Industrial Hemp Resolutions

National State & Local Resolutions:

The National Farmers Union (NFU) passed a resolution in 2013 urging "the president, attorney general and Congress to direct the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to reclassify industrial hemp as a non-controlled substance and adopt policy to allow American farmers to grow industrial hemp under state law without affecting eligibility for USDA benefits"
Policy - Adopted March 2-5, 2013
Read the text of NFU Policy Statement here (HTML).
Download the text of NFU 2013 Policy on hemp here (PDF file 207k).

The North Dakota Farmers Union (NDFU) passed a resolution in 2009 for their 2010 Program of Policy & Action urging "the President, Attorney General and Congress to direct the United States Drug Enforcement Administration to differentiate between industrial hemp and marijuana, and adopt a policy to allow American farmers to once again grow industrial hemp, thereby legalizing the production of industrial hemp and its use in American manufacturing efforts, without requiring DEA licenses."
Policy Statement - Adopted November 20 - 21, 2009
Download the text of NDFU Policy Statement here (PDF file 316k).
Download the full NDFU 2010 Program of Policy & Action (PDF file 616k).

The Rocky Mountain Farmers Union (RMFU) passed a series of resolutions in 2009 for their 2010 Policy stating, among other things, that "We support the decoupling of industrial hemp from the definition of marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. We demand the President and the Attorney General direct the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to differentiate between industrial hemp and marijuana and adopt a policy to allow American farmers to grow industrial hemp under state law without requiring DEA licenses."
Policy Statements - Adopted November 20, 2009,
Download the text of RMFU Hemp Policies here (PDF file 120k).
Download the full RMFU 2010 Program of Policy & Action (PDF file 268k).

The National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA) passed a resolution in 2013 urging the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP or Drug Czar's office) to collaboratively develop and adopt an official definition of industrial hemp, and urged Congress to statutorily distinguish between industrial hemp and marijuana and to adopt policies which would allow U.S. farmers to grow industrial hemp.
NASDA Policy Statements updated with amendments passed during the 2013 Winter Policy Conference. Updated February 25, 2013
Read the text of NASDA Policy Statement here (HTML).
Download the text of NASDA Policy Statement here (PDF file 123k).

The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) adopted a resolution in 2000 strongly urging the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Office of National Drug Control Policy (Drug Czar's office) to collaboratively develop and adopt an official definition of industrial hemp. This is a strong statement for common sense as the NCSL is widely respected and regarded for its conservative and prudent approach on a variety of issues.
Industrial Hemp Policy - Adopted December 15, 2000
Click here to read the NCSL industrial hemp resolution.
Click here to read the letter that NCSL wrote to President Clinton in support of industrial hemp. (PDF files 4k and 64k, respectively)

County Resolutions:

Michigan - 2011
Download the text of the NEMCOG Industrial Hemp Resolution here (PDF file 3MB)
Download the text of the Alcona County Industrial Hemp Resolution here (PDF file 21k)
Download the text of the Montmorency County Industrial Hemp Resolution here (PDF file 2.5MB)
Download the text of the Oscoda County Industrial Hemp Resolution here (PDF file 28k)
Download the text of the Presque Isle County Industrial Hemp Resolution here (PDF file 454k)

State Legislature Resolutions:

To date, seven states have passed hemp resolutions: California, Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, Vermont and Virginia.

California - 1999
HR 32
Read and adopted by a vote of 41 to 30 on 9/10/99.
Download the text of HR 32 here (PDF file 43k).

Colorado - 2010
HJR10-1027
Concerning the recognition of industrial hemp as a valuable agricultural commodity, and, in connection therewith, urging Congress to clarify the federal definition of industrial hemp, facilitate domestic production of industrial hemp, and remove barriers to state regulation of the production of industrial hemp. Introduced in House on 4/23/10. Passed in House on 5/5/10. Introduced in Senate on 5/6/10. Passed in Senate as ammended on 5/12/10. Summarized bill history.
Download the text of HJR10-1027 as Introduced here (PDF file 20k).
Download the text of HJR10-1027 as Passed here (PDF file 24k).

Montana - 2009
SJ 20
Resolution urging Congress to legalize industrial hemp. Third Reading and Passed the Senate by a vote of 48 to 1 on 2/23/09. Third Reading and Passed the House by a vote of 89 to 11 on 4/02/09. Signed by Senate President on 4/3/09. Signed by House Speaker on 4/6/09. Filed with the Secretary of State on 4/6/09.
Download the text of SJ 20 here (PDF file 16k).

Montana - 1999
HR 2
Resolution passed by both houses of the legislature.
Download the text of HR 2 here (PDF file 60k).
or here (PDF file 10k).

New Mexico - 2009
HM 47
A memorial requesting the New Mexico Department of Agriculture to investigate the feasibility of state incentives for commercialization of industrial hemp and that Congress be requested to acknowledge the difference between marijuana and industrial hemp and to clearly legalize the commercial production of industrial hemp. Companion bill to SM 30. Introduced 2/19/09. Passed the House by a vote of 44-23 on the 32nd Legislative Day. Signed on the 33rd Legislative Day.
Read the text of HM 47 here (HTML).
Download the text of HM 47 here (PDF file 48k).
Download the Final version of HM 47 here (PDF file 24k).

New Mexico - 2009
SM 30
A memorial requesting the New Mexico Department of Agriculture to investigate the feasibility of state incentives for commercialization of industrial hemp and that Congress be requested to acknowledge the difference between marijuana and industrial hemp and to clearly legalize the commercial production of industrial hemp. Companion bill to HM 47. Introduced 2/16/09. Passed the Senate by a vote of 25-12 and Signed on the 47nd Legislative Day.
Read the text of SM 30 here (HTML).
Download the text of SM 30 here (PDF file 44k).
Download the Final version of SM 30 here (PDF file 32k).

New Mexico - 2007
HM 49
A memorial requesting the New Mexico Department of Agriculture to study the viability of a legal hemp industry; urging Congress to recognize industrial hemp as a valuable agricultural commodity and to take certain other actions. Passed House 59-2 on 3/5/07. Signed 3/6/07.
Download the text of HM 49 Final Version here (PDF file 24k).

North Dakota - 2009
HCR 3026
A concurrent resolution urging the United States Drug Enforcement Administration to allow North Dakota to regulate industrial hemp farming without requiring federal applications, licenses, or fees. Adopted by the House on 2/19/09. Adopted by the Senate on 3/24/09. Returned to the House on 3/25/09. Signed by the Senate President on 4/1/09. Filed with Secretary of State on 4/7/09.
Download the text of HCR 3026 as Introduced here (PDF file 12k).
Download the text of HCR 3026 as Enrolled here (PDF file 16k).

North Dakota - 2007
HCR 3028
A concurrent resolution urging Congress to recognize the multiple benefits of industrial hemp and to facilitate the growing of industrial hemp and the expansion of industries reliant on industrial hemp-based products. Introduced on 1/26/07. Adopted by House on 2/13/07. Adopted by the Senate w/amendment on 3/15/07. Returned to House on 3/16/07. House concurred w/ Senate 4/3/07 on an 89-0 vote. Signed by Senate President and House Speaker on 4/5/07. Filed with Secretary of State on 4/5/07.
Download the text of HCR 3028 as Introduced here (PDF file 12k).

North Dakota - 2007
HCR 3042
A concurrent resolution urging Congress to direct the United States Drug Enforcement Administration to differentiate between industrial hemp and marijuana. Introduced on 1/26/07. Adopted by House on 2/13/07. Adopted by the Senate on 3/12/07. Signed by Senate President and House Speaker on 3/20/07. Filed with Secretary of State on 3/20/07.
Download the text of HCR 3042 as Introduced here (PDF file 12k).

North Dakota - 2001
HCR 3033
Adopted by the House on 2/20/01. Adopted by the Senate on 3/23/01. Filed with the Secretary of State on 4/3/01.
Download the text of HCR 3033 as Enrolled here (PDF file 10k).

North Dakota - 1999
HCR 3038
Passed as amended by the House on 2/17/99. Adopted by the Senate on 3/18/99. Filed with the Secretary of State on 3/23/99.
Download the text of HCR 3038 as Enrolled here (PDF file 8k).

Vermont - 2009
JRS 26
A joint resolution in support of Act 212 of 2008. The General Assembly urges Congress to Recognize industrial hemp as a valuable agricultural commodity and that the United States Drug Enforcement Administration allow the states to regulate industrial hemp farming without federal applications, licenses or fees. Senate: Read first time & placed on action calendar per Rule 51 on 3/27/09. Adopted on the part of the Senate on 4/14/09. House: Rules Suspended and Taken up for Immediate Consideration, Read second time, proposed amendment agreed to, the resolution was read the third time and passed in concurrence with proposal of amendment on 5/4/09. Senate: House proposal of amendment concurred in on 5/6/09.
Download the text of JRS 26 as Introduced (PDF file 40k).
Download the text of JRS 26 As adopted by the Senate and the House in the Senate Journal of 5/6/09 page 1692 (PDF file 20k).

Vermont - 2000
JRS 98
Resolution as Adopted.
Download the text of JRS 98 as Introduced here (PDF file 5k).
Download the text of JRS 98 as Adopted here (PDF file 6k).

Vermont - 1998
JRH 149
Resolution as Adopted.
Sent to the DEA and Congressional delegation.
Download the text of JRH 149 here (PDF file 4k).

Virginia - 1999
HJ 94
Passed into law.
Download the text of HJ 94 here (PDF file 17k).

For more information on industrial hemp please see our Download Center, which includes quick links to articles, farming guides, films, legal cases, legislation, letters, regulations, reports & studies.


Vote Hemp can help you in developing platform planks and resolutions, as well as help you research the process for introducing and passing them. We can also provide you with educational materials and information to help you in the process.

If you have any questions concerning the information posted here, or you would like us to review drafts and make suggestions, please contact us.

If you would like to get involved, please see our Volunteer page.

 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
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